that1nkyone:

reinbel:

bechnokid:

jetgreguar:

dioblunto:

superchalmers:

swayingscales:

3go:

hitoshura0:

zettafab:

cenchia:

fursona:

steven-stoned:

darkfliercynthia:

shychiaichi:

a green humanoid with arm swords

a pastel cat dog rabbit thing with ribbons on it

Real Chicken

white and blue featherless handbird that lives in the…

Little mole with spikes that turns into a pretty shitty drill

a fat ugly pig

just some swords in a pile

dumb fat piece of shadow bullshit

white n’ blue dinosaur-bird-thing

Some skinny-ass green helmet dudes

a weak-ass bug with a x4 weakness that takes like sixty levels to evolve the lazy ass

Magikarp.

*gets up*
*looks at Tumblr*
*Dash is fucking nothing but people reblogging more things about how shitty gamers are*
*closes Tumblr*

Alright fine I was tagged by both maguneedsalife and seluhawk and I’m bored so

15 Things that Make Me Happy

  1. Pokemon (I just left this one from Magu’s when I copied it, it might not be #1 but it’s definitely on there)
  2. Having friends around and talking to them and sharing dumb videos and cute animal pictures. Friends generally. Also puppies. They still count as friends, though. All puppies are my friends.
  3. Watching dumb YouTube videos, usually probably Game Grumps or something.
  4. Lego. Building stuff with it, having it around. Holding a chunk of ABS in my hand always makes me feel good. Well, except when I’ve got a fever, then the tactile sensation feels profoundly unpleasant and gives me hallucinations. Influenza sucks balls, guys. Don’t do flu. Not even once.
  5. Magic. Not your stage or street magic - though I think that’s cool and am interested in that too - but ridiculous stupid fantastical fake magic. Wizards. Pentagrams. Dragons. Grimoires. SICK MAJYYKS
  6. Sci fi. ROBOTS. SPACE. SPACE TRAVEL. Things that are treated as the thematic polar opposite of magic and fantasy even though it’s just “mostly set in space and the future” instead of “mostly set in sorta-Europe and in the past”. Both are pretty cool, though I do kinda lean more towards the magics. But… robots.
  7. Prime numbers. Look, I picked maths as a major for a reason, and it’s because I’m a dork for numbers.
  8. When a plan comes to fruition.
  9. Getting to use slightly uncommon phrases like “come to fruition”. Seriously guys we can do so many things with this language, and we so rarely seize the chance to talk like a supervillain. WHAT’S UP WITH THAT
  10. Getting to go out and meet friends, rare as it may be.
  11. Getting to have some quiet alone time, rare as it may be.
  12. LONELY ROLLING STAR. Also like dozens of other songs, particularly Daft Punk, Gorillaz, Weird Al. I have eclectic tastes.
  13. Gurren Lagann. Also, as a result of that, spirals.
  14. Looking up cool science/history/mythological factoids.
  15. that1nkyone. Yeah you get your own entire number even though you also fall under #2. Because you do such a damn good job of cheering me up if I’m down. Because your art is cool and seeing you improve over the years has been great. Because you had a large influence on my musical tastes that make up #12. Because our conversations so often result in me laughing like a dork over something one or both of us said. Because I could come up with at least four reasons, that’s why.

Okay now I’m meant to tag people or something, and then they have to go and do the thing also. Or something. It’s like the ice bucket challenge, or literally any other “challenge” type thing you’ve seen online, but with less potential for pneumonia or donation to charity.

But yeah okay how’s about that1nkyone, rinnywinnywoowah, stingdragon, samurai-sky, aaaaand brontozaurus. Yeah those five for no particular reason, other than you are all people who belong on that list and also are on that list. Don’t actually do the thing if you don’t want to, but writing about things that make you happy tends to make you happy. So be happy.

I have a tendency to write too much.

Alright, a popular movie I want to see has come out. Time to unfollow like 30 people until I actually get to see it.

CIGUL, 7, GO

that1nkyone:

He really likes the top hat.

One class down, approximately infinitely many more to go.
And my next one is over two hours away. With nothing to do in the meantime.

I made a robot friend.

I made a robot friend.

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:
Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.
And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:
I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).
The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.
I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.
So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point. 
After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.
Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.
Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As someone stuck in a maths degree I no longer enjoy, told to make all the creative endeavours I enjoy a hobby, this post (by one of my favourite webcomic artists) means quite a lot to me.

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:

  1. Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
  2. Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
  3. Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
  4. Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.

And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:

I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).

The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.

I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.

So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point.

After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.

Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.

Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As someone stuck in a maths degree I no longer enjoy, told to make all the creative endeavours I enjoy a hobby, this post (by one of my favourite webcomic artists) means quite a lot to me.

I think I got a small idea of what it’s like to look over a cherished toddler who shits everywhere and needs constant attention
1nky, describing having to take care of her dog for three days.

So I got this card today

image

(And by “got” I mean Rin got one from a random stranger at the convention and felt bad that I didn’t get one but whatever)

But still, it was a nice gesture. And, like the card requested, I eventually found someone so attractive, I had to pass it on.

image